Shooting the Moon

thegingerpire:

Moonrise tonight. 

thegingerpire:

The stars tonight at the park. 

sagansense:

jtotheizzoe:

I don’t want to alarm anyone, but on Saturday, the moon ate Saturn.
I guess it finally got tired of it showing off those rings.
(just kidding, this was a rare and wonderful occultation of Saturn by the moon, captured here by Colin Legg. Read more at Bad Astronomy)

sagansense:

jtotheizzoe:

I don’t want to alarm anyone, but on Saturday, the moon ate Saturn.

I guess it finally got tired of it showing off those rings.

(just kidding, this was a rare and wonderful occultation of Saturn by the moon, captured here by Colin Legg. Read more at Bad Astronomy)

thegingerpire:

Clear sky tonight.

colchrishadfield:

Mars sends love to us all on Valentine’s Day - hearts abounding from the romantics at NASA JPL

colchrishadfield:

Mars sends love to us all on Valentine’s Day - hearts abounding from the romantics at NASA JPL

sci-universe:

Here’s a great image pointing out the new supernova first spotted last week (January 21) as an unfamiliar object in the otherwise familiar galaxy M82.This galaxy is about 12 million light-years away, so the light from a supernova explosion reached the Earth just recently. It was bright enough to be discovered with a modest telescope in north London when astronomer Steve Fossey was taking students through a routine lesson at the University of London Observatory.
Image credit: Adam Block, Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter, U. Arizona

sci-universe:

Here’s a great image pointing out the new supernova first spotted last week (January 21) as an unfamiliar object in the otherwise familiar galaxy M82.

This galaxy is about 12 million light-years away, so the light from a supernova explosion reached the Earth just recently. It was bright enough to be discovered with a modest telescope in north London when astronomer Steve Fossey was taking students through a routine lesson at the University of London Observatory.

Image credit: Adam Block, Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter, U. Arizona

sci-universe:

Using the Herschel Telescope, the European Space Agency has detected water vapor on Ceres, the largest and roundest object in the asteroid belt.
"This is the first time water vapor has been unequivocally detected on Ceres or any other object in the asteroid belt and provides proof that Ceres has an icy surface and an atmosphere," said Michael Küppers of ESA in Spain.
Scientists believe Ceres contains rock in its interior with a thick mantle of ice that, if melted, would amount to more fresh water than is present on all of Earth.
The results come at the right time for NASA’s Dawn mission, which is scheduled to arrive to Ceres in the spring of 2015, where it will take the closest look ever at its surface.
Full article here. Image: illustration of Ceres by Walter Myers.

sci-universe:

Using the Herschel Telescope, the European Space Agency has detected water vapor on Ceres, the largest and roundest object in the asteroid belt.

"This is the first time water vapor has been unequivocally detected on Ceres or any other object in the asteroid belt and provides proof that Ceres has an icy surface and an atmosphere," said Michael Küppers of ESA in Spain.

Scientists believe Ceres contains rock in its interior with a thick mantle of ice that, if melted, would amount to more fresh water than is present on all of Earth.

The results come at the right time for NASA’s Dawn mission, which is scheduled to arrive to Ceres in the spring of 2015, where it will take the closest look ever at its surface.

Full article here. Image: illustration of Ceres by Walter Myers.

 Martian sunrises, as seen by the HiRISE orbiter

[source] [h/t: opticallyaroused]

sci-universe:

A three-colour composite mosaic image of the Eagle Nebula (Messier 16), and its so-called “Pillars of Creation”.
Credit: European Southern Observatory/M.McCaughrean & M.Andersen